Friday, January 30, 2015

Paying The Price

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE

      by Greg Kishbaugh

     The goals of the sustainability movement are pushed from many different directions, including retailers, CPGs and converters. But ultimately the biggest driver may lie with consumers themselves.
     A newly released report from Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) finds that well more than half of American shoppers (56 percent) would like to have more sustainable options for the packaged products they buy. Additionally, just more than 42 percent of respondents said they would be willing to pay an added cost for more sustainable packaging.
     As should come as no great surprise, the younger the respondent, the stronger they leaned in favor of greater sustainability initiatives and options. Just more than half of the Generation X respondents and 55 percent of Baby Boomers stated they would like to see a wider range of sustainable packaging options, while 63 percent of Millennials indicated they have a strong preference for sustainable packaging.



     “The U.S. market is seeing an increasing number of Americans placing higher levels of importance on the role of sustainability — be it reused, recycled, certified, or deforestation-free materials — in a company’s product packaging and broader environmental practices,” said Ian Lifshitz, Director of Sustainability and Stakeholder Relations, Americas, for Asia Pulp & Paper (APP). “This is a fundamental and critical marketplace shift with significant implications for brands, particularly with regard to how they integrate environmental sustainability in the paper and product packaging they sell in the marketplace and, more broadly, across their supply chains and global operations.”
     Millennials are also the most determined when it comes to evaluating the overall environmental footprint a company demonstrates to the world. Just 20 percent of Baby Boomers say they conduct research into a company’s environmental practices before making a purchase, with 31 percent of Generation X respondents saying the same thing. But a full 50 percent of Millennials report that they will use a company’s environmental responsibility to make purchasing decisions.

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Lessening The Footprint

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE

      by Greg Kishbaugh

     Considering the maturity of the packaging market, it is astounding the amount and scope of change it continues to undergo. With most consumers demonstrating increased concern over environmental issues, retailers, CPGs and converters have shown spectacular levels of innovation as they aim to meet increasingly stringent sustainability goals.
     Procter and Gamble recently released its 16th annual sustainability report, unveiling the fact that the company has reached its waste reduction goals six years earlier than planned and its pulp certification goal a year early. The fact that the company now has 70 global facilities delivering zero manufacturing waste to landfill is a testament to what can be accomplished when innovators up and down the supply chain work in unison.
 
     “Our teams are driven to make a significant, positive and lasting impact on the communities we serve through our operations, product designs and innovative partnerships, and this year’s report showcases the results of that dedication,” said Martin Riant, P&G Executive Sponsor of Sustainability and Group President of Global Baby and Feminine & Family Care. “Our work to drive zero manufacturing waste to landfill across our manufacturing facilities has exceeded expectations with nearly 50 percent of our sites achieving this goal since 2010.”      
     In the area of waste, the company exceeded its waste reduction goal by achieving only 0.4 percent of input materials being disposed of as manufacturing waste to landfill across all its facilities; the goal called for less than 0.5 percent by 2020.      
     The company also reduced total emissions by 14 percent and installed two co-generation energy systems that will considerably reduce CO2 emissions, including 120,000 less metric tons per year at its largest global plant in Mehoopany, Pennsylvania.      
     And the company continues to make advancements to its packaging. Like CPGs and converters the world over, it strives to continually analyze ways in which its packaging can not only provide more benefit to the consumer but can also lessen its environmental footprint.      
     The company’s new Mr. Clean Liquid Muscle packaging, for instance, includes a 2.5x compaction formula with 45 percent less packaging and 64 percent less water per bottle, along with a unique single-dosing cap that ensures people don’t use too much. The company has committed to further compact its detergents by 2018 in North America, with 25 percent less water, less CO2 and less plastic.      


     The report also highlights four new 2020 sustainability goals P&G launched in October:     
     • Reduce water usage at manufacturing facilities by 20 percent per unit of production.      
     • Provide 1 billion people access to water-efficient products.      
     • Double the use of recycled resin in plastic packaging.      
     • Ensure 90 percent of product packaging is recyclable or that programs are in place to create the ability to recycle it.     
     “Our teams, in collaboration with some leading external partners, have delivered high-impact innovations and projects, helping us exceed goals in two key areas of the business, and closing in on others.” said Riant. “We recognize that there is more to be done and are committed to focusing on areas where we can make the biggest positive impact.”

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Waste Not, Want Not

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE

      by Greg Kishbaugh

     The USDA reports that 36 million tons of food is wasted each year in the United States alone, worth $162 billion. Per family, that comes to 654 pounds worth more than $936. Wasted food and consumer items is an enormous problem and one that consumers are beginning to recognize more.
     In a recent survey conducted by an industry tech company, nearly 90 percent of respondents felt that the average amount of food and consumables a typical person throws away is a “huge waste,” while 85 percent resent the fact that they are not getting their money’s worth. Additionally, 57 percent believe it is the manufacturer, and packaging producers, that are to blame for the waste.



     Respondents hate wasted consumer products so intensely that when asked to rate their dislike for certain activities on a scale from 1 to 10, wasting consumer products received an average score of 4.8, which is the same rating as doing taxes.
     In these days of increased environmental awareness, it is a bit surprising that only 15 percent of respondents cited environmental concerns as the main reason they dislike waste. Most respondents seemed much more concerned with the monetary impact.
     So intent were respondents in getting every drop of consumer goods from their packaging, that 13 percent reported having injured themselves in trying to do so.
     The average consumer aversion to waste is an undisputed opportunity for converters. An average of 70 percent of respondents said they would be willing to change brands if it had more efficient packaging.

Monday, October 27, 2014

A Timeline Of Innovation

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE

      by Greg Kishbaugh

     The history of the flexo industry is intriguing not only for how far it has progressed, but for the odds it needed to surpass in order to attain its current status as a world-class printing process.
     A new infographic released from Anderson & Vreeland celebrates the history of flexo while also turning an eye toward flexo’s future.
     The industry began somewhat inauspiciously. The infographic explains the origin of the industry lies in the first patented press being built in Liverpool, England by Bibby Baron and Sons. It came, sadly, to be known as “Bibby’s Folly” because the ink smeared so badly on the original model.


To dowload the infographic, click here.

     In time, aniline dyes come and go, rubber plates are introduced, followed a decade and a half later by liquid photopolymer.
The infographic breaks down the modern market into several interesting statistics, not least of which is that flexo, having overcome a host of liabilities over the past century, now controls a 60 percent market share in the printed packaging market.
     Of the $260 billion that flexo accounts for in the printed packaging market, approximately $125 billion of the market share comes from corrugated, followed by flexible packaging with $81 billion, labels and tags with $56 billion and folding carton with a very distant $1.5 billion.
     A&V also takes a snapshot of future developments that will influence the industry, including digital printing and complete digital workflow.

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

The Well-Being Of Packaging

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE

      by Greg Kishbaugh

     One of the key drivers of the sustainability movement  comes from consumer goods companies committed to reducing packaging. Mondelez International, an American multinational confectionery, food and beverage conglomerate that comprises the global snack and food brands of the former Kraft Foods, has issued its first sustainability report entitled The Call for Well-Being, 2013 Progress Report. The report details steps Mondelez has made to meet its well-being metrics in the areas of mindful snacking, sustainability, communities, and safety.


     Mondelez had earlier made a commitment to eliminate 50 million pounds of packaging by 2015. The company reports that it is on target having eliminated 48 million tons between 2010 and 2013.
     “Packaging is part of the joyful experience people have with our brands,” said the report. “It is why we are always looking at new ways to use fewer materials while increasing the amount of recycled content in our packages.”
     A number of initiatives have aided Mondelez in achieving its goals to this point. Just two such moves have elimnated nearly 13 million pounds of packaging.
     In Australia, Cadbury Dairy Milk bars converted to a new single-layer flow wrap that eliminated 2.8 million pounds of packaging.
     Jacobs Velvet coffee was relaunched in new packaging that eliminated more than 10 million pounds of packaging weight.
     The company utilizes a proprietary Eco-Calculator™ to aid in its sustainability efforts. “The tool helps us create more environmentally conscious packaging by determining the percentage of post-consumer recycled materials, as well as the amount of energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with creating and disposing of a pack,” says the report.
     The Eco-Calculator is web-based allowing teams worldwide to access the information.
     “Our business success is directly linked to enhancing the well-being of the people who make and enjoy our products and to supporting the communities where we grow our ingredients,” said Irene Rosenfeld, Chairman and CEO. “It’s this belief that inspired our Call For Well-being.”

Friday, August 29, 2014

A Surge In Labels

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE

      by Greg Kishbaugh

     World demand for labels looks to remain strong in the coming years, increasing 4.9 percent annually to nearly 58 billion square meters in 2018 with a value of $114 billion, according to World Labels, a new report from Freedonia Group.
     “Renewed vigor in global manufacturing output will be the primary factor driving growth,” noted analyst Mike Richardson. Additionally, the report suggests that the global economic expansion that continues to develop in the wake of the recent economic downturn will drive consumer spending on packaged goods.



     Growth in spending, unsurprisingly, will remain highest in the world’s developing regions where consumer spending is growing most rapidly.
     The Chinese and Indian label markets will fuel expansion in the Asia/Pacific region at a faster rate than the rest of the world. The blistering pace of China’s economic growth will slow a little in coming years, but the country’s enormous market for labels will still account for nearly one third of label demand through 2018. The Indian market is smaller in scope than that of China but it is projected to grow at a faster rate.
     Gains will not be as dramatic in the developed markets of the United States and Western Europe but the growth will be a marked improvement over that of the 2008-2013 period. During the economic decline, many countries experienced slowdowns in label demand and even the best performing economies struggled. But, according to the report, growth in manufacturing, especially in food processing, will lead to a revitalized label market in the future.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Gardening Waste

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE

      by Greg Kishbaugh

     One of the most compelling and interesting components of the sustainability movement is that it has forced companies to think far beyond the normal parameters of their standard operating procedures.      
     Case in point, Garnier, the beauty and skin care products producer, has figured out a way to turn its packaging waste into gardens. Teaming up with TerraCycle, an upcycling and recycling company that collects difficult-to-recycle packaging and repurposes the material, Garnier recently launched an initiative called the Garnier Green Garden.      

     
The Garnier Green Garden campaign creates community gardens made from non-recyclable post-consumer beauty waste.
The campaign began by transforming more than 1,500 pounds of recycled personal care packaging waste into a  Green Garden in Harlem. Garnier and TerraCycle then overhauled a garden at a special needs school in the Bronx.
      
     To further the scope of the program, Garnier and TerraCycle introduced a “Where Should Our Garden Grow?” campaign to award one recipient with a new community garden. After a public voting period, The ReFresh Project of New Orleans was named the winner. The ReFresh Project’s ReFresh Community Farm is a new teaching farm located in Treme/Mid-City New Orleans. The new garden will reportedly be capable of yielding more than 2,000 pounds of vegetables, fruit, herbs, and flowers.
      “The plastic components of the garden, such as raised beds, picnic tables, and trash receptacles are made from recycled beauty-care packaging waste collected through Garnier’s Personal Care and Beauty Brigade®,” said the company. “The Brigade is a free fundraising program that donates money to a charity of the collector’s choice for every piece of beauty and personal care packaging waste returned to TerraCycle for recycling. The collected waste, which would otherwise be destined for landfills, consists of non-recyclable hair care, skin care, and cosmetic packaging.”      
     No question that innovation continues to rule the day in terms of the impact of packaging upon the environment.